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Other Helicobactor species

How do you catch Hp? From your mother when she kisses you? From brothers and sisters as a small child? From sexual partners as adults (kissing)? From dirty water (fecal contamination)? From animals? Who knows???

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Wil
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2014 10:40 pm

Other Helicobactor species

Post by Wil » Wed Feb 26, 2014 11:50 pm

I recently read an article about other Halicobactor species of bacteria. Are there other Halicobactor species, other than pylori that can affect humans?

Helico_expert
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Posts: 2430
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2011 7:20 am

Re: Other Helicobactor species

Post by Helico_expert » Thu Feb 27, 2014 7:50 pm

Yes, it is possible that other Helicobacter species to infect human. Some farmers stay too close with the farm animals and they can be infected by H. suis or H. heilmannii from domestic animals.

For your information, there are now over 40 species of Helicobacter discovered.

aakicee
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2015 9:12 pm

Re: Other Helicobactor species

Post by aakicee » Tue Apr 14, 2015 9:16 pm

So my question is whether there is a specific Australia-wide protocol for who and when to test and treat for H. pylori.


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Last edited by aakicee on Mon Nov 30, 2015 4:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Helico_expert
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Re: Other Helicobactor species

Post by Helico_expert » Wed Apr 15, 2015 12:45 pm

I have not physically seen the guideline, but I think there is. The prevalence of H. pylori in Australia is only around 15%. I interviewed a few doctors and they say they only have 1 or 2 patients a month asking for urea breath test. So, in such low prevalence country, it is better to use the Test and Treat approach.

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